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Lawrence Bender: The Visionary Producer Behind Tarantino’s Masterpieces

Lawrence Bender isn’t exactly a household name, but many moviegoers would certainly recognize a lot of the titles in his filmography. Bender, born in 1957 in the Bronx borough of New York City, has been the producing force behind nearly all of Quentin Tarantino’s worldwide smash hits, including Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, and Inglourious basterds Volumes 1 and 2. He was raised in New Jersey after being born in New York, and throughout his long and illustrious career has been nominated three times for the Best Picture Academy Award. Not bad for a producer who originally set out to be a dancer!

Many movie enthusiasts will have their own favorites out of his oeuvre of cinematic works of art, but in the opinion of this writer, none of the movies he’s made since Reservoir Dogs has had the style and urgency of that incredible piece of moviemaking. Reservoir Dogs is Tarantino at his absolute best: the jazz-like pitter patter of the movie’s script, the tension that seeps into every nook and cranny of the “hideout” warehouse, and the relationships that form and fray between the characters. Utilizing his star-studded cast at the height of each of their powers, Tarantino weaves a thoroughly unpredictable and taut thriller that nonetheless brings belly laughs from unexpected scenes.

The genius of the movie comes largely from its spare nature. There are few big budget explosions or chase scenes (in fact, the movie only cost just over $1 million to make) but Tarantino still wrings out every bit of pathos and excitement out of his limited means. Bender’s vision in aligning himself with a master artist like Tarantino was a stroke of genius for the noted producer, and it set him on a path to worldwide renown, success and wealth. Now into his 60s, Lawrence Bender shows no signs of slowing his pace — not that he needs to keep working! But in the opinion of many, the third movie (and first Tarantino work) he ever produced will always stand as his greatest achievement in the world of film. Surely he wouldn’t be too upset by that!

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0004744/

Denzel Washington’s Iconic Films

 

Denzel Washington is a prolific actor, and has starred in many good black movies. He has starred in plenty of films and has established himself as an actor who is very passionate about his craft. He has starred in a lot of films and has gained status as one of the most respected stars in Hollywood.

 

Glory

 

Denzel Washington stars in the drama about the civil war. He stars alongside Morgan Freedman and Matthew Broderick. It is a dramatic story about the courage people have shown in the fight to end slavery in America. They have risked it all for the cause.

 

Malcolm X

 

This is another one of Denzel’s iconic roles. He stars as Malcolm X in the story that has centered on the life of a street hustler turned speaker for Islam. Malcolm X was one of the strongest influences for blacks. Denzel Washington has done well to bring this role to life.

 

Training Day

 

Another iconic role of Denzel, he stars as a cop who has crossed the line and gone rogue. The film depicts Denzel’s character breaking in Ethan Hawke’s character. What follows is a film that reveals a lot of crookedness.

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American Gangster

 

Another iconic film in which Denzel stars as Frank Lucas, a gangster who has risen to power in his community. American Gangster was directed by Ridley Scott, brother of Tony Scott, who used to regularly direct Denzel.  It also stands as one of the top urban movies, to crossover into mainstream popularity.

 

Denzel has also branched out into stage plays which include Fences, written by August Wilson.

 

Lovaganza Wants To Unite The World

Lovaganza from Colin Hesterly on Vimeo.

There’s a lot of love that goes into art. From the decision of that which must be created, to its eventual crafting on j-scott.com, to its eventual display and those who come to love it as the artist had, emotional attachment runs hot with well-produced artistry.

Film is an excellent example of an outpouring of love. Certain movies don’t become cult classics without their devoted fan-bases continuing to tout their excellence. Perhaps one of the reasons people love film so much is that it connects them with other people in a way where common ground can be easily achieved. When two people have undergone the same experience, they both have a starting point from which to base ideas. Additionally, films are known to be inspirational. They can put a sort of mental spirit in a person that drives them on to greater things.

Because of this close-knit, love-centric, inspirational nature in films, the producers of Lovaganza have chosen cinema as a means of displaying their new technology to the world. IMMERSCOPE is 3D that does not require any kind of glasses. Instead, a 180-degree screen brings audiences into a performance that hits like a live theatrical play on levels of intimacy, but maintains that Hollywood spark of visual excellence.

Lovaganza has a trilogy of films in the works, and principal photography has started on the first installments. In 2017, a traveling caravan will tour the world so that a taste of the coming festival will be made manifest. Sequential film releases will follow this tour until 2020, when Lovaganza will simultaneously debut at eight strategic points across the globe. The event will last a staggering four months, and has planned showings in The Middle East, Asia, Africa, Oceania, Europe, and America.

Themes of the trilogies will center around unity, and a kind of traveling convoy in similitude to that which will wrap the planet soon. A sort of bohemian celebration of individual cultures will take place. Comedy, adventure, mystery, intrigue, romance, thrills–each of the Lovaganza trilogies portends to provide such experiences. And beyond the IMMERSCOPE technology, the actual event will feature live presentations, interactive entertainment, and a World’s Fairs-type atmosphere reminiscent of the festivals of yesteryear.

Lovaganza.com is the website where all updates and progress reports are made. The fan base for Lovaganza is growing, and the scope of this project makes that growth understandable. Such a world-wide effort is poised to make history, and many want to remain abreast of news.

Learn more about Lovaganza: https://www.designideas.pics/lovaganza-2020/

Visual Effects Are Becoming More and More Innovative

Visual effect is often an integral part of a movie; in some cases, it can make or break a film. Although sci-fi and horror movies often rely heavily upon visual effects, movies of other genres also use it in certain scenes. Visual effects are most often computer generated and depending on the budget, it can range from very poor to state-of-the art.

Visual effects are generally in four catagories: matte painting and stills that serve as background; live-action effects with blue or green screening; computer animation, which includes 3-D animation, computer lighting, texturing and particle effects and digital effects, or more commonly known as digital FX. This often involves the manipulation of photographs to make an environment look more realistic.

One of the foremost visual effects specialists in the industry is John Textor. A 1987 graduate of Wesleyan University, Testor is currently chairman of Pulse Evolution Corporation. He also serves as chairman and CEO of Digital Domain. Some of the films under Textor’s leadership include Ender’s Game, Real Steel, Flag of our Fathers and Pirate’s of the Caribbean at World’s End. Textor has also helped create virtual images of entertainers Tupac Shakur, Marilyn Monroe and Michael Jackson.

Visual effects have been used to some degree since the beginning of film as Bloomberg has reported in the past. Even in its most primitave forms, it has managed to wow audiences. The 21st century innovations are pretty cool. Cutting-edge techniques have advanced dramatically in just the last 10-15 years. There’s not telling how far visual effects will have evolved in the next 10-15.